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Asos to ban Mohair, Silk, Cashmere, and Feathers towards animal welfare

Asos, the second biggest clothing site in the UK, pledges to be free from some animal-derived products from 2019 towards animal welfare

The fashion world is being more conscious in recent times in the struggle against animal cruelty. Recently Asos, the global online retail platform, has made the decision to ban silk, mohair, cashmere, and feathers across its entire platform by January 2019.

In a statement, Yvonne Taylor, Director of Corporate Projects at PETA said, “People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) applauds ASOS for leading the charge for compassion in fashion. In response to PETA’s campaigns, consumers are changing the face of the industry by demanding that designers and retailers ditch animal-derived materials in favor of cruelty-free alternatives that look great without causing suffering.”

Asos is banning animal derived products
Figure: Asos is banning products which contain feathers, silk, cashmere, and mohair from its website.

Tracy Reiman, Executive Vice President at PETA, said, “In response to PETA’s campaigns, consumers are changing the face of the industry by demanding that designers and retailers ditch animal-derived materials in favor of cruelty-free alternatives that look great without causing suffering.”

Asos’s policy stated that “Asos firmly believes it is not acceptable for animals to suffer in the name of fashion or cosmetics.”

“Asos is committed to working with industry expert groups to support the ongoing research, development, and implementation of animal welfare standards and transparency in the leather supply chain,” it said.

Asos follows Zara, H&M, and Topshop, who all pleased about the news, but takes this further, suggesting that this is an issue close to the hearts of their target market, typically young shoppers in their 20s and 30s.

This generation of young people are engaged with issues such as animal rights, and increasingly buying more consciously.

According to the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an American animal rights organization, South Africa is the predominant source of mohair for the international fashion industry, with 50 percent of the world’s mohair coming from the region.

However, managing director of Mohair South Africa Deon Saayman has stated that the company has cooperated with the NSPCA in order to ensure that their manufacturing process is as ethical as possible.

Elisa Allen, UK’s director of Asos, said, “Consumers are changing the face of the industry by demanding that designers and retailers offer clothing and accessories that look beautiful without harming animals.”

Asos has 64.4m visitors in the six months to May 2018 and from the six months before 28 February count 16.5 million customers, clocking in at 29.9 million sales in total, though how many items are made from the soon to be banned products is unclear.

Earlier, in December 2017, London’s Old Spitalfields market announced that it would stop selling fur from 2018, and in February, designer Tom Ford confessed that his views on fur in fashion had changed since adopting a vegan lifestyle.

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