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Timberland, H&M and OVS ranked top transparency index

The index, compiled by sustainable fashion campaign group Fashion Revolution, scored 250 of the world’s largest fashion businesses. The scoring was done according to how much information they disclosed about their sustainability practices.

Fashion revolution
Figure 1: Fashion Revolution, scored 250 of the world’s largest fashion businesses.

Italian men’s, women’s, and children’s clothing retailer OVS topped the index scoring 78% of a possible 250 points, an increase of 44% compared to 2020. This year, it disclosed some of its raw materials suppliers for the first time, and was one of only two brands, alongside Patagonia, to publish data on the number of workers in the supply chain that had been paid a living wage.

H&M Group came in second scoring 68%, then Timberland and The North Face which both scored 69%. European fast-fashion retailers C&A and Vans both achieved 65%.

Gucci achieved a score of 56% and is the first luxury brand to enter the index’s top ten since it launched in 2016.

A total of 20 brands received a score of 0%, including surfwear brand Quiksilver, denim brand Pepe Jeans, and luxury brands Max Mara and Tom Ford.

“We have thereby committed to further disclose information on our work and results related to our strategy to become circular and climate positive, setting clear goals and being transparent about our achievements,” Said Leyla Ertur, Head of Sustainability at H&M Group.

Fashion Revolution, scored 250 of the world’s largest fashion businesses.
Figure 2: Supply-chain transparency is about disclosing the details of all the facilities involved in the manufacturing and production of garments.

On the other hand, Supply-chain transparency is about disclosing the details of all the facilities involved in the manufacturing and production of garments.

That’s why H&M is working continuously to share more supplier information with the ambition to enable full supply-chain transparency.

Fashion Revolution said it is encouraged by increasing transparency among brands. But progress is “too slow” on key issues such as purchasing practices, living wages, overproduction, water use, and carbon emissions in the supply chain.

Almost all (99%) of the 250 brands included in the index did not disclose the number of workers in their supply chain that have been paid a living wage. 96% did not publish a roadmap on how they plan to achieve a living wage for all workers in their supply chain.

While 62% of brands published their carbon footprint in their own facilities, 26% disclosed this information at the processing and manufacturing levels, and 17% at the raw material level.

A total of 18% of the companies in the index published data relating to their order cancellations during the pandemic. Only 14% of brands disclosed the percentage of discounts applied on previously agreed payment terms.

 

 

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